Simon Starling

chikuwaq:

Simon Starling Interview, via MontseBadia.

knaggen:

Simon StarlingShedboatshed (Mobile Architecture no. 2), 2005
At first sight, Simon Starling’s Shedboatshed (Mobile Architecture no. 2) appears to be a readymade. It’s an old shed. It looks a bit the worse for wear, but age will do that to a shed. Things aren’t quite a simple as they appear though and the first clue’s in the title.
Shedboatshed is a shed. Shedboatshed started out as a shed. But it hasn’t always been a shed. Starling turned an old shed, which he’d found in the banks of the Rhine, into a boat which he then used to get to Basel, carrying the unused parts of the shed in the boat. On arrival, the shed was reassembled and exhibited in the Kunstmuseum Basel and later that year in Tate Britain as part of the Turner Prize exhibition, which Starling won.

knaggen:

Simon Starling
Shedboatshed (Mobile Architecture no. 2), 2005

At first sight, Simon Starling’s Shedboatshed (Mobile Architecture no. 2) appears to be a readymade. It’s an old shed. It looks a bit the worse for wear, but age will do that to a shed. Things aren’t quite a simple as they appear though and the first clue’s in the title.

Shedboatshed is a shed. Shedboatshed started out as a shed. But it hasn’t always been a shed. Starling turned an old shed, which he’d found in the banks of the Rhine, into a boat which he then used to get to Basel, carrying the unused parts of the shed in the boat. On arrival, the shed was reassembled and exhibited in the Kunstmuseum Basel and later that year in Tate Britain as part of the Turner Prize exhibition, which Starling won.

watershedplus:

ARTWORK OF THE WEEK

Tabernas Desert Run, 2005
Simon Starling

In 2004 Simon Starling crossed the Tabernas Desert in Spain on a bicycle powered by compressed hydrogen. The only by-product of the journey was water which was used to produce a painting of a cactus.

Click here for more on Simon Starling


As part of the Watershed+ we are happy to introduce a new series to our blog we’re calling Artwork of the Week. Each week we will post an artwork that explores a relationship to water and more broadly environment, infrastructure and process.

snapcatlyf:

RESEARCH: “Autoxylopyrocycloboros”, Simon Starling, 2006.
I saw this work at a recent visit to MONA (which, by the way, was INCREDIBLE and you should definitely go).
Starling fitted a dinghy with a steam engine and attempted to travel across Loch Long. In order to travel, the boat must consume itself for fuel, like an ouroboros, the snake that eats its own tail.
In the presentation of the work an old-school slide-projector cycles through a series of documentation images, but shown in reverse, so that an empty lake grows bit-by-bit into a boat.

snapcatlyf:

RESEARCH: “Autoxylopyrocycloboros”, Simon Starling, 2006.

I saw this work at a recent visit to MONA (which, by the way, was INCREDIBLE and you should definitely go).

Starling fitted a dinghy with a steam engine and attempted to travel across Loch Long. In order to travel, the boat must consume itself for fuel, like an ouroboros, the snake that eats its own tail.

In the presentation of the work an old-school slide-projector cycles through a series of documentation images, but shown in reverse, so that an empty lake grows bit-by-bit into a boat.

Roberto Cuoghi: Šuillakku

marksladen:

image

ICA, London / October-November 2008

The main element in Roberto Cuoghi’s exhibition was an immersive, evocative sound installation filling the ICA’s lower gallery. To make the work, entitled Šuillakku, the Italian artist undertook an imaginative journey back to Mesopotamia in the seventh century BC, when the Assyrian empire was falling into ruin and the city of Ninevah (the site of which is in modern-day Iraq) was ransacked by its enemies. Inspired by Assyrian lamentations to their gods, this intense aural landscape gave the visitor the impression of being surrounded by hundreds of people at a time of great suffering.

Read More

newmuseum:

Roberto Cuoghi researched, built, and played a collection of handmade instruments for Šuillakku – corral version (2008–14), his installation which is now up at the New Museum through Sunday. Each instrument was recorded individually and assembled into a composition, which can be heard in its entirety when visitors stand at the center of the installation.
Image: Documentary photography during the preparation of Šuillakku, 2008. Courtesy the artist and Massimo De Carlo, Milan/London

newmuseum:

Roberto Cuoghi researched, built, and played a collection of handmade instruments for Šuillakku – corral version (2008–14), his installation which is now up at the New Museum through Sunday. Each instrument was recorded individually and assembled into a composition, which can be heard in its entirety when visitors stand at the center of the installation.

Image: Documentary photography during the preparation of Šuillakku, 2008. Courtesy the artist and Massimo De Carlo, Milan/London

newmuseum:

Roberto Cuoghi researched, built, and played a collection of handmade instruments for Šuillakku – corral version (2008–14), his installation which is now up at the New Museum through SUNDAY. 
Image: Documentary photography during the preparation of Šuillakku, 2008. Courtesy the artist and Massimo De Carlo, Milan/London

newmuseum:

Roberto Cuoghi researched, built, and played a collection of handmade instruments for Šuillakku – corral version (2008–14), his installation which is now up at the New Museum through SUNDAY. 

Image: Documentary photography during the preparation of Šuillakku, 2008. Courtesy the artist and Massimo De Carlo, Milan/London

anechoicchamber:

"In 1998, at the age of 25, Cuoghi embarked on another radical first-hand experience. In an attempt to reverse the natural progression of time, he assumed the appearance of his father who, shortly after, became seriously ill. Cuoghi gained six and a half stone, dyed his hair white, grew a long beard, and dressed and acted like his father. Within a few weeks, the artist had transformed himself into an old man: the numbers had been inverted, time accelerated. Neither a performance nor a disguise, Cuoghi maintained his new persona for several years, in an ambiguous struggle between fiction and reality. Although it generated no further art works, news of Cuoghi’s attempt to ‘life-share’, to duplicate and consequently prolong another existence, spread by word of mouth until it passed into art-world lore. Cuoghi’s imitation survived the original, but his body paid a high inheritance tax: when his father passed away, the artist started to reverse the premature aging, but the stress to which he had subjected himself over the years rendered the process extremely slow and painful, even necessitating some surgical operations."

anechoicchamber:

"In 1998, at the age of 25, Cuoghi embarked on another radical first-hand experience. In an attempt to reverse the natural progression of time, he assumed the appearance of his father who, shortly after, became seriously ill. Cuoghi gained six and a half stone, dyed his hair white, grew a long beard, and dressed and acted like his father. Within a few weeks, the artist had transformed himself into an old man: the numbers had been inverted, time accelerated. Neither a performance nor a disguise, Cuoghi maintained his new persona for several years, in an ambiguous struggle between fiction and reality. Although it generated no further art works, news of Cuoghi’s attempt to ‘life-share’, to duplicate and consequently prolong another existence, spread by word of mouth until it passed into art-world lore. Cuoghi’s imitation survived the original, but his body paid a high inheritance tax: when his father passed away, the artist started to reverse the premature aging, but the stress to which he had subjected himself over the years rendered the process extremely slow and painful, even necessitating some surgical operations."

actegratuit:

3-D printed sculpture of an enlarged micro-organism covered in rock dust by Roberto Cuoghi